"Clever photocopying’ is one aspect. Converting to formats capable of digital manipu another. The assumption that the digital is now the lation is record is disturbing. Actually the record remains the thing on which the business action was done."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in Access by Hamish Hawthorn

"At the base of this is the transformation of Badly constructed digitisation projects are simply that format from analogue to digital. format transformation. Connected to thought out purposes, of course this format transformation enables connection to digital systems and quite radically different dissemination mechanisms does transform access enabling multiple simultaneous users, not dependent on a physical location, with endless replicability at high quality"

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in Access by Hamish Hawthorn

"the pieces are so loosely joined that frequently the links don’t work; all too often we get the message (to put it palindromically) “404! Page gap! 404!” But that’s okay because the Web gets its value not from the smoothness of its overall operation but from its abundance of small nuggets that point to more small nuggets. And, most important, the Web is binding not just pages but us human beings in new ways. We are the true “small pieces” of the Web, and we are loosely joining ourselves in ways that we’re still inventing."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in Small Pieces Loosely Joined by David Weinberger

"The result is a loose federation of documents—many small pieces loosely joined. But in what has turned out to be simply the first cultural artifact and institution the Web has subtly subverted, the interior structure of documents has changed, not just the way they are connected to one another. The Web has blown documents apart. It treats tightly bound volumes like a collection of ideas—none longer than can fit on a single screen—that the reader can consult in the order she or he wants, regardless of the author’s intentions. It makes links beyond the document’s covers an integral part of every document. What once was literally a tightly bound entity has been ripped into pieces and thrown into the air."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in Small Pieces Loosely Joined by David Weinberger

"We also need to ask ourselves hard and fund amental questions. For example, with appraisal strategies, can we continue to define these ourselves? Do we need to consider broader documentation strategies, or at least broader and more specific engagement with impacted people and communities, with business and system owners and draw these groups more directly into our appraisal and access frameworks?"

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

"The notion of ‘putting things into things’ also implies that there is an object to be put. This concept, again borne of paper thinking, simp ly does not translate when you are dealing with digital records. These are dynamic creatures; formed of chunks of data linked to other data that can be reconstituted, reused and represented"

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

"Many areas of Australian life present themselves as in need of an archival strategy that does not respect traditional recordkeepin g boundaries; for example, climat e change, water sharing, the mining boom, asylum seekers etc. However current appraisal and access frameworks are failing to connect with big cross-jurisdictional issues. In this environment, traditional considerations of access and appraisal concerns that are based on age or cust odial thinking or cultural heritage or collection management are damaging and uns ustainable. Today we need to identify the opportunities for connecting with information wherever it resides, not just when it is within a single recordkeeping system or the institutional walls of the archive."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

"So delivery of content from our keeping places on its own is not going to get us to the Pharoah’s side. And we are never going to do it better than Google. Sure, we have a monopoly on ‘cool old stuff that no-one has ever seen before’ but this is the stuff retrieved from shelves and discovered by an intrepid reader in our reading rooms."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

"The notion that records people had to ensure that records were pulled from their business context and placed in a dedicated system where we coul d ‘do stuff’ with them has done us a great disservice."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

"All digital data cannot be retained indefinitely through digital system transitions and so the risk of no sy stematic disposal is that swathes of digital data, irrespective of its business value, will be subject to wholesale destruction or purging at system migration or replacement."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in C Findlay Reinventing Archival Methods The Hague 27Jan 2014.pdf by Findlay, Cassandra

Homemade chilli flakes on Flickr.

Homemade chilli flakes on Flickr.

Chilli oil #ediblebalcony on Flickr.

Chilli oil #ediblebalcony on Flickr.

Balcony chilli harvest #ediblebalcony on Flickr.

Balcony chilli harvest #ediblebalcony on Flickr.

"Surely I was an optimistic person back then, she thinks. Back there. I woke up whistling. I knew there were things wrong in the world, they were referred to, I’d seen them in the onscreen news. But the wrong things were wrong somewhere else. By the time she’d reached college, the wrongness had moved closer. She remembers the oppressive sensation, like waiting all the time for a heavy stone footfall, then the knock at the door. Everybody knew. Nobody admitted to knowing. If other people began to discuss it, you tuned them out, because what they were saying was both so obvious and so unthinkable."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood

"Appraisal begins with the questions: wh at is the purpose of making and keeping records, why do people want them, what will they do with them, what will they do without them? Who else besides the formal creators needs them and why? Highlighting the human dimension of archives, acknowledging the place of emotion in archives, both point in the direction of one area of archival research which dwarfs all others with members of the public, family history, and to the most highly used records, immigration records."

Highlighted by Luke Bacon in Appraisal by Hamish Hawthorn